Towards a scientific understanding of who we are

Neanderthal genes increase risk of serious Covid-19, study claims

Sep. 30, 2020 - LONDON, England

Modern humans and Neanderthals could be forgiven for having other issues on their minds when they interbred in the stone age. But according to researchers, those ancient couplings laid a grim foundation for deaths around the world today.

Scientists have claimed that a strand of DNA that triples the risk of developing severe Covid-19 was passed on from Neanderthals to modern humans. The genetic endowment, a legacy from more than 50,000 years ago, has left about 16% of Europeans and half of south Asians today carrying these genes.

Continue reading on The Guardian

Related reading

On Human Nature: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Edition, with a New Preface (Revised)
Not Born Yesterday: The Science of Who We Trust and What We Believe

Your purchase supports HNN and local bookshops.



Human Nature News reports the latest findings across all fields of rational inquiry into the nature of ourselves. We focus on two broad themes where advances have accelerated during recent decades. Our first theme covers the latest scientific research into the nature and origins of human morality, consciousness, social organisation, values, and beliefs. Our second major theme is historical - the evolution of our species, the story of our migrations across the globe, and the earliest developments of human culture.